Better Guitar Scales & Solos in 1 Hour (or Less)

In most cases guitar players will learn their scale patterns within one position. But, we can learn scales a lot faster (and actually apply them better, in more melodic ways), by learning a scale laid out in a double octave. This simple trick stretches the scale out along the fret-board across five or more frets... 

The best part about this trick is that this is really easy to do with any scale. I'm going to show you how you can start doing this with two of the most common scale shapes out there (the "Major and Minor" scale shapes).

Since it's so easy to memorize this concept you'll be able to use this scale approach to perform some jams and guitar solos within about an hour (or less)...

Daily Guitar Deal:



Watch the Video:



The first thing I need you to think of is a double octave layout. In our case we're going to take one octave between the 6th to the 4th string, as well as, go from the 4th string up to the 2nd.



OCTAVE STACKS: Here's what this looks like on the fingerboard using the scale tone of "A" going first from 6th - 4th... and, from 4th - 2nd...

"A" Octaves (6th - 4th and 4th - 2nd strings - in 2 positions).




NATURAL MINOR - STACKED SHAPE:
Next, let's build our initial scale octave layout using an "A Nat. Minor" scale pattern.

"A" Initial Octave Run (along the 6th - 4th off of the 5th - 7th fret).


Now, we're going to build on that and stretch this idea out into the next positions stacked octave.

"A" second Octave Run (along the 4th - 2nd off of the 7th - 10th fret).

These stacked octave patterns create a longer scale layout, that follows 90% of the same fingerboard geometry, (aside from the easy to apply shift of only two notes on the second string - due to the guitars tuning), there's nothing much new to actually learn here. It's almost like you're simply taking the first shape and just placing it up into another area of the neck, but compensating for a strings tuning - that's it.



MAJOR SCALE - STACKED SHAPE:
So, now let's do this exact same thing using a Major Scale and learn how that scale layout can become stacked on the neck too.

Just like we did with that Minor Pattern, we'll begin by building our initial scale layout for the first octaves' shape by using an "A Major" scale pattern.

"A" Initial Octave Run (along the 6th - 4th off of the 5th - 7th fret)


Now, we're going to build on that and stretch this idea out into the next positions stacked octave.

"A" second Octave Run (along the 4th - 2nd off of the 7th - 10th fret)



Thanks for joining me, If you want to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher, then head over to my website at creativeguitarstudio.com and sign up your FREE lifetime membership...

And, when you want more, you can always upgrade to either a Basic, or a Premium lesson package and start studying the guitar courses I've organized for the members of my website.

I hope you enjoyed this video, if you did, then give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more. Thanks again and we'll see you on the next video.

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now




0 comments:

Post a Comment