The BEST Ear Training Exercise You've Never Done!

Develop this powerful ear training routine - so powerful that you can do it in only a few minutes each day to help you develop a better level of understanding for hearing the harmonies found within a keys scales and chords...

Daily Deal: Ibanez GRX70




This practice idea works around using the harmony for a key center along with listening for how we can start building a solid connection between the step-wise position of every chord found within the key signature.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



A guitarist needs to work on hearing how a melodic statement (based upon the chord of a key) relates over to other positions of the scales harmony. The exercise routine in this lesson starts by picking a key and establishing the harmony along the guitar strings.




ESTABLISH THE KEY:
The first exercise is going to operate around laying the groundwork for the key and the guitar string that we'll be working from. For our first exercise, we'll be working in the key of "C Major" and our guitar string will be the 5th string.

In getting started, we're going to perform all of the chords that are found within the key of "C Major" and we'll do this starting as, "Root, third, fifth," (three-note triads) built from the fifth string root... Follow along through the exercise below...

C MAJOR HARMONY: Root Position



Next, we're going to expand upon this study. We'll focus on the first inversion of each of those chords from the key of "C Major." This will place the chords 3rd tone in the bass and have us now working off of the 4th guitar string. Follow along through the chord inversions shown below...

C MAJOR HARMONY:1st Inversion



Now that we've established the key center and built all of the chords that harmonize into the key from their root and their third chord tones, we're now going to create a melodic statement that will flow across the key and match the harmony.



This process travels step-wise going through the key signature's chord positions using a Melodic Statement "Matched" to each degree of the harmony. Follow along through each melodic statement given below...

 click on the image above to enlarge full-screen

click on the image above to enlarge full-screen



After learning the first statement, travel through the key performing the melodic line across every chord from the keys harmony.


The idea of this exercise is three-fold:

1). better understanding of chord harmony
2). develop a more detailed awareness of chord inversions along the neck
3). to use your ear (and your knowledge of intervals) combined with your awareness for the guitar fingerboard, to move a melodic passage across the neck while remaining diatonic to the key and to each chord along the neck.




CONCLUSION:
This study is a solid exercise! Just keep in mind that the exercise will become more complex as you increase the detail involved with your melodic statement ideas.

I hope this exercise will help you to better understand how the harmony of a key is tied to both the chords (from the key) and to a melody that can function diatonic to the key signature.

Once you establish your melodic statement, this style of exercise will force you to learn how to use your ear to pull the melodic statement from chord to chord within the key signature.

And, again if you find this difficult to do in the beginning, just stick to really simple melody lines. After you get better at hearing the relationship of each note moving diatonically in your melody, (and seeing how the intervals relate onto the neck), you can begin making your melodies more complex.

Thanks for joining me, If you'd like to "Figure Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar," take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find. The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...Until next time - take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now




The What, When, Why of Guitar Scales & Keys

A lot of guitar players know a number of scale patterns, some will even know what keys that they relate to... But very few guitar players understand what scales are best applied, when they need to be used within a song, and even less will know why they work... So, that's what we're going to cover on this episode of the Guitar Blog Insider...

DAILY DEAL: Yamaha FGX800C Solid Top Cutaway Acoustic-Electric



90% of the scales we use are from key signatures. Those keys relate to which type of scale we will need to use over a chord progression. Plus, the chords in a progression also relate back to the key signature as well. So, if you study how to tie together the chords, and the scales with how they relate to the overall key signature, you'll have the information that you'll need to play guitar solos, riffs and licks over 90% of the songs you'll ever come across.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



Let's begin by taking a look into how this can operate using a common group of chords from one of the "major key" signatures. The progressions "V-Chord" is highlighted in red to identify the stress /pull back to the "I-Chord" (A Major).

Key of "A Major" - Chord Progression (I, III, VI, V, I, IV, V)


When working within a key signature, we need to understand a few details about the key. These will include; the sharps or flats found within it, and how chords move from one to another to create stresses and accents.

Cadence: The way chords move from bar to bar and within a measure to establish an impression of stress and relaxation. When chords become stressed they want to return to a home base. This is referred to as a resolution, in music we call it the "Cadence.".

Even if you don't know a lot about music theory, you'll be able to hear these ideas occur just from listening. In our progression we can clearly tell that the "A Major" chord is our "home" chord.

Perfect Cadence: There is a stress in sound that leads us into each occurrence of the "A" major chord across the measures of our example progression. Something to take note of is how the "A" chord is preceded by the 5th chord of the key, (E). In music we refer to this idea as an "Perfect" cadence.

Plagal Cadence: There is another kind of cadence we need to watch out for. The other popular harmony movement is called a "Plagal Cadence." This Cadence occurs when the "home" chord is preceded by the 4th chord of the key. Listen to our same "A Major" progression, but this time how it functions using a "Plagal" cadence. NOTE: The "IV-Chord" (D Major) is highlighted in red to clearly identify its position.

Key of "A Major" - Chord Progression (I, III, VI, IV, I, II, IV)


As you can tell from the progressions above, chord progressions and key signatures are tied together by how the chords function measure to measure, as well as, how they create stress and then relax that stress through different forms of resolution.



MINOR TONALITY:
There's another element to all of this, and it's related to the tonality. Sometimes called the "Major or Minor" color of a progression. This is actually very easy to distinguish once you can understand resolution. Because the cadence will point you to the resolution chord, and allow you to hear the "home" chord.

In the progressions thus far, we have been functioning within the Major key. But, the cadence can also work in the direction of establishing Minor key color.

This means if your home (resolution) chord is "Minor" you're dealing with a "Minor Tonality" progression. Let's use the same key signature to create a resolution into the relative minor key of "A Major" ....(F# Minor). NOTE: The stress chords pulling us back to the "F# Minor" as being a home chord are highlighted in red.

F# Minor Progression:Chord Progression (Im, Vm, VI, VII, Im, IVm, Vm)


Notice how the "F# Minor" chord becomes the point of resolution and forms the impression of a "home" chord sound across those chord changes. This is exactly WHAT YOU'RE LISTENING FOR when it comes to understanding what a series of chord changes are doing musically, and how their stress and relaxation influence the next step.



DEVELOPING MELODIC IDEAS:
The next step involves what scale you need to consider for performing a melodic line. As you could tell from the chord progressions, we have colors of both Major and Minor.

Those colors also tell us whether we need to play the major or minor scales over our progression. One of the easiest ways to select those sounds is through the Major and Minor Pentatonic scales.

MAJOR KEY MELODY:
Let's use that first key of "A Major" progression and create an "A Major" melody line, using the "A Major" Pentatonic scale.

 A Major: Major Pentatonic Melody



The Pentatonic scale is fantastic for creating melody lines over progressions because it has such a natural lean toward melody. The scale has no 1/2 steps making it very similar to an arpeggio and this gives it the ability for its group of notes to produce melody.

MINOR KEY MELODY:
Now, just as with the Major Pentatonic being a fantastic way to create melody over Major keys, the Minor Pentatonic is also excellent for producing melody over minor situations. In the next example. we'll use "F# Minor" Pentatonic to create a melody over that "F# Minor" chord progression.

F# Minor: Minor Pentatonic Melody



The application of the Pentatonic scale for our melodic ideas (once again) works so nicely here in the minor key, because it uses notes that are closely related to the arpeggios, (which offers us an excellent way to connect to the chord tones. This "chord tone connection" means that from the information we've covered here, you can become even more aware of the value in understanding key signatures.

The information covered will not only help you better understand chord tone connections, they will also help you notice how chords from the key relate to the color of the tonality (through the use of cadence points).

When it comes to starting into the world of playing solos, the strength that exists from using the Major or Minor Pentatonic as a starter scale for creating melody will be extremely helpful. After getting used to playing melody lines with the Pentatonic Scales, you can begin going even further with these ideas by using other scales and modes.



CONCLUSION:
All of this information works in the same way, regardless of the key, the musical style, or the notes involved. And, while Jazz and Classical harmony can become slightly more complex in its nature (of how these ideas are applied), the principles are all still the same across every style of music.

I'd like to end the lesson by saying, thanks for joining me... If you want to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher, then head over to my website at creativeguitarstudio.com and sign up your FREE lifetime membership.

When you want more, you can always upgrade to either a Basic, or a Premium membership package and start studying the guitar courses that I've organized for the members of my website.

I'd also be interested to hear your thoughts on all of this in the comment section below. If you enjoyed this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more on YouTube. Thanks again and we'll catch up next time, for another episode of the, "Guitar Blog Insider."


___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now




GUITAR SOLOING #014 - Soloing with Mixolydian Mode



December 08, 2017:
Lesson 014 - Soloing with Mixolydian Mode

The Mixolydian mode is our most valuable sound for covering the Dominant 7th chord quality. 

Since this scale offers us the coverage for the Dominant chord it is an important part of both our composition and improvisation tool kits for many different styles of music... 

Lesson 014 explores this... 

In Part One of the lesson, we'll study how to use Mixolydian as it functions off of some very unique modal harmony applications. In Part Two of the lesson, we'll practice more advanced applications of Mixolydian with "V-Minor" and "VII Major" resolution concepts. Plus, we'll also explore how Mixolydian is the perfect way to cover non-functioning Dominant 7th chords.

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE:  In example one, a "C Mixolydian" modal progression is using the tonic chord of "C Maj." and dropping back a whole step to it's "VII-chord" (Bb Maj.). In example 1a, I've composed a 2-bar progression that you can learn and then record for jamming over. In example 1b, I've included a short melody line that is composed from out of the "C Mixolydian" mode.

Example two applies a similar harmony as was used in example one, where the Mixolydian's "I-Chord" (E), moves into the, "VII-chord" (D/E). This time our harmony is from "E Mixolydian." However, the main difference in example two lies in the addition of the tonics "Dominant 7th" chord (E7). The progression focuses on how the addition of a "Dominant 7th" highlights the effects of the Mixolydian color.
 




PART TWO:
In example one, a "C Mixolydian" modal progression is using the tonic chord of "C Maj." and dropping back a whole step to it's "VII-chord" (Bb Maj.). In example 1a, I've composed a 2-bar progression that you can learn and then record for jamming over. In example 1b, I've included a short melody line that is composed from out of the "C Mixolydian" mode.

Example two applies a similar harmony as was used in example one, where the Mixolydian's "I-Chord" (E), moves into the, "VII-chord" (D/E). This time our harmony is from "E Mixolydian." However, the main difference in example two lies in the addition of the tonics "Dominant 7th" chord (E7). The progression focuses on how the addition of a "Dominant 7th" highlights the effects of the Mixolydian color.


Daily Deal: Washburn Jazz Series J3TSK


The chord progression in example four does not function harmonically within one single tonality. The first two measures (D7sus4, D7), can be covered using the, "D Mixolydian," mode. However, in the next two measures, the chords (Bb/C and C7add9) do not relate to the first two measures harmony. They would need to be covered by using, "C Mixolydian."


Paid members can download the handout along with the MP3 jamtrack in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

________________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

My Favorite "4-Step" Key Signature Exercise [KILLER LESSON!]

Are key signatures something of a mystery for you? Are you missing out on the knowledge of every keys sharps and flats? Do you know how to produce the harmony for all of the keys? If any of this knowledge is poor or (heaven forbid) non-existent, you need to start learning your keys right away!

DAILY DEAL: Yamaha RevStar RS720B - w/ Bigsby Tremolo


Many guitar players are unaware of how the modes operate. And, far too many guitarists are confused on how all of the; keys' corresponding chord qualities relate back over to the key signature. These mysteries also exist around the process of harmonic analysis too.



If these topics have been a serious issue for you then I've got good news, I'm going to help you by offering up a solution to all of this. I'm going to give you a great 4-part exercise that will not only help you get to know the notes of all your keys, but, you'll also learn the chords that correspond. Plus, you'll also learn about the related; modes, the arpeggios, and the pentatonic scales for every degree of every key.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



The first idea that will function as our "initial start" to begin our 4-part study through key signatures will involve establishing the Major tonic as a triad chord.

We'll be using the key of "A Major" across all of our examples, so our tonic chord will of course be an "A Major." From there, we'll build the scale of the tonic chord, which will be the "A Major" scale. But we'll refer to it in our exercise here as the "Ionian" mode.

The second step of our exercise will be that of performing the Pentatonic scale for this degree, which in our case will be the "A Major" Pentatonic.

The 3rd step of our exercise will be performing the 7th arpeggio related to our tonic chord. That would be the "A maj7."

Finally, in the 4th step, we'll perform the 7th quality chord related to this scale step, which is, "A maj7."

TONIC DEGREE EXERCISE: "A Ionian"


Now that you understand how this 4-part exercise works with the tonic of the key, we're going to carry on doing this with all of the other notes of the key...


2ND DEGREE EXERCISE: "B Dorian"


The second note in the key of "A Major" is the note of "B." The chord is "Bm" with the associated scale being "B Dorian," the Pentatonic is "B Minor Pentatonic," and the arpeggio is "Bm7," along with the same 7th chord.

3RD DEGREE EXERCISE: "C# Phrygian"


The third note (in the key of "A Major") is the note of "C#." The chord is "C#m" with the associated scale being "C# Phrygian." The Pentatonic is "C# Minor Pentatonic," and the 7th arpeggio is "C#m7," along with the 7th chord of the same name.




 4TH DEGREE EXERCISE: "D Lydian"


The fourth note in the key of "A Major" is the note of "D." The chord is "D maj" with the associated scale being "D Lydian," the Pentatonic is "D Major Pentatonic," and the 7th arpeggio is "Dmaj7," along with the same name 7th chord.

5TH DEGREE EXERCISE: "E Mixolydian"


The fifth note in the key of "A Major" is the note of "E." The triad chord is "E maj" with the associated scale being "E Mixolydian." The Pentatonic is "E Major Pentatonic," and the 7th arpeggio is "E dom.7," along with the 7th chord of the same name and quality.

6TH DEGREE EXERCISE: "F# Aeolian" (F# Natural Minor)


The sixth note in the key of "A Major" is the note of "F#." The triad chord is "F#m" with the associated scale being "F# Aeolian," mode. The Pentatonic is "F# Minor Pentatonic," and the 7th arpeggio is "F#m7," along with the 7th chord of the same name and same quality.

7TH DEGREE EXERCISE: "G# Locrian"


The seventh and final note in the key of "A Major" is the note of "G#." The triad chord is "G# dim." with the associated scale being "G# Locrian," mode. The Pentatonic is "G# Diminished Pentatonic," (1 b3 4 b5 6). And, the 7th arpeggio is "G#m7(b5)," along with the 7th chord of the same name and same quality.



Once you develop this exercise, it will likely take you 5-7 min. to complete every degree within a key. And, once you develop it into your study routine, you can do it every day with a new key, (until you memorize all of the keys).

Not only will you memorize all of the keys, you'll also memorize all of the; notes, the correct pentatonic scales for every scale step, the diatonic arpeggios for every key, and the corresponding chords that go along with them all.

It's an excellent study of key signatures (and everything else that relates to them). Plus, it can help every guitar player accomplish a very thorough understanding of diatonic harmony as well. It's a KILLER exercise!



If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com. My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find. The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...Until next time - take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now




ACOUSTIC GUITAR 013: Bossa /Samba Latin Guitar Style


Acoustic Guitar 013: 

Bossa /Samba Latin Guitar Style...

Latin rhythms apply what is referred to as the Clave. This is the bedrock rhythm of the Latin feel. On guitar it can incorporate bass-lines and chord shots with a contrast of these two parts performed either "on the beat," or at times, "off the beat" using fingerstyle. 

Latin acoustic players will play through these grooves differently according to the idea, but their focus is based upon the "Clave," which forms the rhythmic foundation of Latin music... 

Daily Deal:


This lesson breaks down the various feels of Latin Guitar playing with eight exercises. Each example will cover different elements of the Latin feel.

The examples work together to explore different areas of Latin guitar playing that center around developing the Latin Clave. 


This will include the study of time signatures such as 6/8 and cut-time (2/2) feel. The lesson will then progress to the performance of grooves including; Samba, Bossa Nova, Mambo and Cha Cha...

Watch the Video:



PART ONE:
In example one, I introduce the most basic Latin rhythm, the "2-Bar Clave." This feel encompasses nearly all of the most popular feels found in Latin music. The rhythmic feel shown in example one uses a key of "C Minor" tonality to demonstrate the primary Latin feel along with a popular variation.

Example two shifts the time signature to 6/8. This triple-meter feel demonstrates the concept of using this compound time signature for performing Latin groove. A key of "A Minor" tonality riff is shown within the 6/8 feel. The harmony is simplistic, (using only three guitar strings of 4th through 2nd). However the unique groove of 6/8 produces a feel that really stands on its own rhythmically.

Example three, introduces a new time signature into the lesson plan with the appearance of cut-time feel (also known of as the 2/2 count). The cut-time signature offers players the opportunity to groove out on a busy pulse, while maintaining a more laid-back perspective of the feeling of the groove. A progression in the key of "A Dorian," sets the mood over two examples that apply the same harmony offered as similar yet subtly different rhythms
.

 
PART TWOThe exercises in example four bring in new rhythmic grooves by way of the "Mambo" and "Cha Cha," rhythms. These beats will tend to really get the listener (and the player) up and moving. The examples shown are offered in the key of "B Minor." While each example uses minimal note groupings from the chord types, we still achieve a strong pulse with interesting short melodic bass-note patterns.

Example five establishes a Clave rhythm that is based around an active single-note line combination of rhythmic, melodic and harmony based ideas. The riff in example five offers the chance to understand how filler tones (used as bass lines) can work together to firmly establish bass-line harmony within a groove.

This examples key of "G Minor" Clave rhythm is centered around a "Gm7" chord with a turnaround that employs the "VII-chord" of the key (F major). Together the rhythm along with the bass-line establish the harmony of the Clave as a whole
.




Related Videos:

RELATED VIDEOS for:
Bossa /Samba Latin Guitar Style... 

ACOUSTIC GUITAR 012: Acoustic Blues - Harmonies and Riffs

ACOUSTIC GUITAR 011: Chordal Picking Technique

Acoustic Guitar 010: Classical Guitar Proficiency

______________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes